News

There are three types of news available from CounterCorp:


1. News about CounterCorp

 

The Countercorp News e-mail list is the primary source of up-to-date information about CounterCorp programs, events (including the Anti-Corporate Film Festival), and other activities and announcements.

 

It is a low-volume list, rarely exceeding more than one or two messages a month (and usually even less), except during the Festival. To subscribe, enter your e-mail address in the subscription form below the News box on the right side of this page.

 


2. News about corporations

 

Corporation Watch is a longer form, occasional blog intended to dispel the still widely held notion that most corporations are generally beneficent, by shining a spotlight on the daily litany* of articles in both the mainstream and alternative press about the nature and effects of corporate power and influence, exploitation and abuse, and culture and pathology.

 

There is no fixed schedule for new postings, but we try to add to it at least once a month. The easiest way to follow Corporation Watch is via the RSS feed. (You can also read it directly on our website.)

 

Along similar lines, our Corporate Crime Blotter is a constantly updated page (and Twitter feed) of links to news specifically about corporate crime — including accusations, investigations, indictments, lawsuits, settlements, and convictions. We usually post to it at least a couple of times a week. The easiest way to follow it is to subscribe to the feed.

 


3. A combination of both kinds of news

 

For a mix of both 1 and 2, subscribe to CounterCorp's general Twitter feed, which is the fastest way to get updated information about CounterCorp events, programs, and other projects, as well as occasional news about corporations and public policy. We usually post to it a couple of times a month.

 

You can subscribe to it using your favorite Twitter software, via the RSS feed, or through your mobile device by texting "follow CounterCorp" to the number 40404 in the United States. (You can also see the two most recent tweets in the first column at the bottom of this website.)

 

 

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* Although most mainstream media coverage of corporations and the economy comes from "embedded" business reporters who identify with and rarely question the underlying assumptions of the corporate ethos or the orthodox economic dogma that perpetuates it, there is nonetheless a steady drip of reporting on business and the economy that offers an insight into the true nature and tendencies of corporations.